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Trish Edmond

My advice about mentoring is it shouldn’t be forced. Recognize that mentors are all around you and are not necessarily people with whom you work.

Trish Edmond is a Professional Engineer and Associate at Golder Associates Ltd.

Trish attended the Technical University of Nova Scotia (now Dalhousie), majoring in Civil Engineering, and later received a master’s degree in Engineering Science from the University of Western Ontario specializing in geo-environmental engineering. Following graduation Trish commenced her career in the field of environmental engineering working on a variety of projects that were mostly for land developers and the federal government dealing with site investigations and contaminated sites. She then began doing more waste related work and over the last ten years Trish’s experience has been primarily in hydrogeological and engineering projects at numerous municipal solid waste facilities in eastern and northern Ontario.

As a lifelong fitness enthusiast, Trish actively participates in local road running events, bikes and curls. She supports her children through actively volunteering in local community organizations of which they are a part.

Tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your current job?

I am a waste management specialist and Associate at Golder Associates Ltd. in Ottawa. I work as an engineer in project manager or project director roles, assisting clients with projects varying from groundwater and surface water compliance monitoring and contaminant transport modelling to permitting new facilities. I am also involved in managing Golder’s waste practitioner team in Ottawa and Ontario.

What made you want to pursue a career in engineering?

Like many other engineers, mathematics and science were always my favourite subjects in grade school. In high school my guidance counsellor gave me aptitude tests that all came back resoundingly that I should pursue a career in engineering. Although I don’t think I fully appreciated what I was getting into, I decided to follow that route for my university education.

What’s your favourite part of your job?

I think there are many things that are my “favourite”. I have had the privilege to be involved in numerous multidisciplinary projects where I have interacted with an entire team of scientists, engineers and technologists. This is always a fantastic experience in working together to solve a large complex problem and really listening to and using each individual’s input. I love problem solving, in particular figuring out conceptual models on how groundwater and surface water are likely to behave and interact on a particular site. I also enjoy actively participating in Golder’s office engagement team (known as the “People Team”) and supporting the career development of others in my office.

How do you celebrate National Engineering Month?

I wouldn’t say that I celebrate National Engineering Month but with March break falling in the same month, I do typically encourage my kids and their friends to explore science by visiting the Canada Science and Technology Museum and organizing / conducting some home experiments. This year I look forward to reading the profiles of inspiring women on this website each day.

What advice do you have for young women who hope to pursue a career in your field?

I think my advice for women or anyone would be to keep up your math and science studies so that doors will always be open to you. Seek out individuals who are working in science and engineering and don’t be shy to ask questions about what exactly it is that they do. For women, recognize that even if there are more men in this industry, don’t worry about it, you are their equal.

How would you describe the relationship with your mentor/mentee?

While there are people that I formally mentor, many of the mentoring relationships I have (mentor/mentee) are informal. To me, these informal relationships have always grown from mutual respect and often friendship. I think these are important qualities because they support a relationship built around trust. My advice about mentoring is it shouldn’t be forced. Recognize that mentors are all around you and are not necessarily people with whom you work.

Through outreach and professional development activities, research, partnerships, thought leadership and online initiatives, we work with industry and academia to educate on the value of diversity for innovation, to inspire women to thrive and to celebrate the contributions of women in science and engineering.
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