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Monika Luebke

Don`t be afraid to ask questions. Engineering involves life-long learning and improvement.

Monika started her career with Pratt and Whitney Canada in 2000 touching various aspects of turbofan engine compressor research and development over a span of 10 years both as a designer and as a structures and aerodynamics analyst. Under the mentorship of experienced Engineers, she worked on various aspects of airfoil design, FEA and CFD modeling, test support and field reliability. This experience laid a solid foundation for her to move into project management where she is currently supporting engine accessories on post certification programs, primarily investigating hardware performance related to field events. Throughout her career she’s also had the opportunity to engage with satellite engineering offices and suppliers worldwide allowing her to broaden her reach around the globe.

Tell us a little bit about yourself, what is your current job?

Small Turbofan Project Engineer – Accessories & Bypass Duct Modules

I act as a focal point leading post-cert engineering tasks including design and development providing cross function guidance and expertise. Involves prioritizing and budgeting various internal/external requirements within Engineering. I am responsible for meeting final budget and program objectives.

What made you want to pursue a career in engineering?

I enjoyed physics, I liked math, Engineering seemed to be a good fit. I was exposed to the industry at a young age by my dad. He was an electrician and often took us on tours as kids at whatever company he was currently employed at. I remember doing a project in early grade school with his help on “how to build a garage.” My parents encouraged me to speak with people in the field (and in other fields) to really understand what options were out there. As a young adult, my dad`s colleagues at an Engineering consulting firm were always willing to share their experiences with me and I also got exposed to what my brother was learning in University (Mechanical Engineering) and the opportunities open to him and decided to follow in his footsteps. My physics teacher in high school was also instrumental and encouraged me to consider the field. She had worked as an Engineer in the military and piqued my interest to figure out how things work.

What’s your favourite part of your job?

The people. The work is extremely interesting, every day there`s something new to learn and experience and I`m always kept occupied trying to figure things out, but really, it`s the people that make it worth my while to come in.

What advice do you have for young women who hope to pursue a career in your field?

Work hard and don’t give up. It`s going to be worth you`re effort. And don`t be afraid to ask questions. Engineering involves life-long learning and improvement.

Through outreach and professional development activities, research, partnerships, thought leadership and online initiatives, we work with industry and academia to educate on the value of diversity for innovation, to inspire women to thrive and to celebrate the contributions of women in science and engineering.
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