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Audrey Girouard

Audrey's Biography

Dr. Girouard is an assistant professor at the School of Information Technology at Carleton University, Ottawa, and leads the Creative Interactions Lab. As a human computer interaction researcher, she specializes in next generation interactions. Her work pioneers novel interaction techniques with emerging user interfaces through software and hardware design, development and evaluation. Her research focuses on deformable user interactions, flexible displays, and bend gesture inputs. Dr. Girouard completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Human Medial Lab at Queen’s University, she obtained her PhD from Tufts University, and her undergraduate degree in software engineering from Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal.

I am an assistant professor in the School of Information Technology at Carleton University, Ottawa. I conduct research in the field of human computer interaction: I look at how we can use novel technologies to better interact with novel devices, whether faster, more intuitively, or more creatively. My work is focused on deformable user interactions, which are devices that react when users bend, twist, or squeeze them.

I get to work with novel devices, prototype, and invent new ways of using upcoming technology; it’s a lot of fun to imagine the future. I also really like working with students who are creative and passionate about discovering how to use these new gestures to help people.

The School of Information Technology at Carleton is the host of undergraduate programs in interactive multimedia and design, computer networks, photonics and laser technologies, and information resource management. We also have graduate programs in human computer interaction, digital media and computer networks. All of these programs allow us to train students in information technology to become leaders in the IT field in Canada.

I get to work with novel devices, prototype, and invent new ways of using upcoming technology; it’s a lot of fun to imagine the future. I also really like working with students who are creative and passionate about discovering how to use these new gestures to help people.

I’m a professor in academia, and I love my job. Hence, my career direction is to keep doing what I do, teaching and supervising interesting students and researching novel topics that might shape the way we interact with computers in the future.

Information technology is all about teamwork. In class, I integrate teamwork early on to allow students to develop group interaction skills, including sharing ideas, collaborating on the implementation, writing reports, and making presentations. It also allows both undergraduate and graduate students to refine their expertise by having specialized roles they enjoy within a team. In my research lab, we collaborate and hold group meetings so students can share their expertise and help each other, even if everyone is responsible for their own project

Probably not a lot, other than maybe paying more attention to certain classes that I didn’t think would be useful to me later one. You never know what you will work on in the future, and what skills might come in handy.

I really like what I do, and part of this is due to my path so far. I ended up here because I let my interests guide me, sometimes without really knowing what it would mean in the long run, but it allowed me to meet interesting people that have inspired me, and it led me here.

 

 

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